Make Time to Play

“Did you ever hear a small boy complain of having to hang about a railway station and wait for a train? No; for him to be inside a railway station is to be inside a cavern of wonder.” –G.K. Chesterton

boy in train station

Children are naturally creative primarily because they’re curious and playful. The experiment endlessly, let their minds wander freely, and they experience imaginative worlds with such detail that it’s often clever. 

Although the adult world is filled with deadlines and pressure, we have to continue to make time to play. It is our duty and our right to create space in our day for imagination. Perhaps then we will be as clever as children.

What is Play?

Happy Monday! As we start our work week, I wanted to remind us all of the importance of play. What exactly is play?

Play is light hearted and enjoyable. When it stops being fun, people stop playing. It is voluntary yet it operates within given boundaries. It is trivial although the outcomes are often highly significant. It is completely absorbing, the opposite of repetition and routine. And finally, it is necessary in order to live a meaningful existence.

We can (and should) grow up but we should never stop playing.

“The master in the art of living makes little distinction between his work and his play, his labor and his leisure, his mind and his body, his information and his recreation, his love and his religion. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence at whatever he does, leaving others to decide whether he is working or playing. To him he’s always doing both. ” – James Michener

The Problem with The New Age

The problem with New Age Spirituality is that it whispers we can be gods. It plays on our desire to be able to count on ourselves, carve our own paths, and determine our own futures.

No doubt, it alludes to God, and offers reasonable tribute to God in the way of time, attention, and love but, ultimately, New Age Spirituality says these things are ours, not His.

The New Age suggests that we are nouns, when in fact we are, and always will be, simply adjectives.

12 Things I Learned From My Dog

Self Improvement Sunday

12 Things I Learned From My Dog

 1. Be loyal.

2. People have to earn your trust.

3. Rest and play are important daily practices.

4. There is nothing quite as thrilling as the wind in your face.

5. Always run to greet your loved ones.

6. Be direct with others. Let them know if they’ve invaded your territory.

7. Become a master at forgiveness.

8. Find joy in the simplicity of a long walk.

9. When you’re happy, show it. Jump around. Wag your entire body.

10. It’s easy to be a good listener. Just be silent, sit close, and gently nuzzle the one who is talking.

11. If what you’re looking for is buried deep, keep digging until you find it.

12. Find the sunshine and rest in it.